I Don’t Like Mornings Either

Mornings at Translations with AM
I have a list of many interesting and complicated topics I want to write about on this blog, but I haven’t found the time to do so yet. In the meantime, you can have a rather superficial comment on a fleeting perception of mine.

I met a whole bunch of interesting translators at the conference that took place in Christchurch last weekend. It started early in the morning and you could see how many of us there were feeling out of place and put off by the early hours. You could tell we were all part of the same kin.

NAATI Preparation Workshop 2016

NAATI Preparation Workshop at Victoria University
I spent my (sunny) Saturday morning inside Victoria University’s Language Lab surrounded by other interpreters, going through the AUSIT Code of Ethics and studying for the Paraprofessional and Professional Interpreting examinations offered by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters Ltd (NAATI), the national standards and accreditation body for translators and interpreters in Australia.

Danes use the same word for “marriage” and “poison”

Flag of Denmark in front of Nyhavn, Copenhagen, Denmark. Photographed by Niels Bosboom.
Flag of Denmark in front of Nyhavn, Copenhagen, Denmark. Photographed by Niels Bosboom.
Flag of Denmark. Photo: Niels Bosboom

My mate said, and added: “I figured you’d get a kick out of that”. And of course I did!

Some of you might have come across this piece of information while browsing the infinite void that we call “the Internet”. After some research, I found out that the word to express these two meanings in Danish is “gift”, which brings a whole new level of greatness to the situation.

That Time When I Was a Court Interpreter

Translations with AM: Translator's LifeA couple of days ago I appeared in court as an interpreter and enjoyed it so much that I can’t wait to do it all over again. I know I have gone missing from this website for a while, but there’s been so much going on! But, now that life has been settling back to normal once again, I am back here to share this experience with you.

The Equivalent to Being An Astronaut When I Grow Up


Yes, we are all more than happy to  finally see Leo get an Oscar, but let me take a second to point out that those who don’t speak the English language wouldn’t have been able to understand anything he said during his speech if it weren’t for the simultaneous interpreters who translated the content for us. SIMULTANEOUSLY, because the coverage was live.

When you take a second to reflect upon the fact that these people interpret speeches and dialogues which are generally delivered under the pressure of strict time limitations and deeply moved by the situation, the whole job becomes just as incredible as that of the astronaut we all wanted to be when we were kids. Congratulations to the interpreters in charge.

Gender in Conference Interpreting: Social Constructs, Sexism and Biases

Scrolling through my feed of endless posts about language, translation and interpreting, I came across this title: “Why so few men?: Gender imbalance in conference interpreting”. The feminist translator in me just couldn’t resist it. I had to read that article even when I suspected I was not going to like what I found.
Well, I didn’t. The piece written by Rachael Ryan and published in the website of the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC) offered, in a very objective manner, an insight into the pervasive misconceptions we all have to deal with on a daily basis, but allow me to share with you what I read into it.